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Posted on May 20, 2008 in Campaign '08, Democrats, Party Politics, RNC

Obama Leads McCain in Dollars, sort of.

I hope this storyline changes soon (from CNN.com):

WASHINGTON (CNN) — Sen. Barack Obama raised millions more than his Democratic rival, Sen. Hillary Clinton, and presumptive Republican nominee Sen. John McCain in April. Obama brought in $31 million, his campaign announced Tuesday.

 Clinton, the New York senator and former first lady, raised $22 million in April, campaign spokesman Howard Wolfson said. McCain’s take of more than $18.5 million was a new high for the Arizona senator, according to his campaign’s monthly finance report.

Though it’s not so bad for the party as a whole (from AOLNews.com/AP).

The RNC, which is the party’s main political arm, had nearly 10 times more cash on hand than its Democratic counterpart at the end of April, a notable GOP advantage in what has otherwise been Democratic fundraising dominance this election.

The committee on Tuesday reported having $40.1 million in the bank. The Democratic National Committee had $4.4 million.

The RNC raised $15.7 million in April compared to $4.7 million by the DNC.

Significantly, the financial disparity comes in a presidential election year when the candidates rely on the parties to mobilize voters and promote their message. Overall this year, the RNC has raised more than $52 million, the DNC has raised more than $22 million.

This shouldn’t be a reason for us to get cocky, because once the Democrats have their nominee, it should be no shock to anyone that they will probably match us dollar for dollar, especially if their Democratic White House Victory Fund idea actually takes off. This new concept will give the DNC the ability to maximize donor potential even before there is a nominee.

As part of the unusual pact, donors can contribute up to $33,100 to the newly created Democratic White House Victory Fund. The money would benefit whichever candidate becomes the nominee. Some Democrats said the deal would permit some of Clinton donors to get behind Obama without having to write a check directly to his campaign.

The fundraising success of the RNC is something that should be evaluated further. Does this suggest that the RNC is simply being more aggressive in their fundraising tactics? Does this mean that Republicans are more comfortable giving their money to the RNC than they are to John McCain?

Or, does this simply mean that the McCain campaign is doing its fundraising in segments – building the RNC war chest now, and waiting to do the more aggressive campaign fundraising when more people are mobilized behind his campaign and the mud starts flying?

I think it’s probably a little of each.